As far as us gardeners are concerned, few pleasures in life compare to biting into that first sun-ripened tomato. After getting off to a rather dry start and needing supplemental watering, many of us found our gardens more on the too wet side and wishing some of that rain would go to California where it is really needed. I even found some slugs crawling up the tomato stakes instead of hiding beneath the mulch! Apparently, even they were looking for higher ground!

standing wtr around raised beds

Standing water around raised tomato beds. Photo by dmp.

Vegetable gardeners in New England know that tomatoes face several diseases including blights, leaf spots, anthracnose and so on. We deal with this problem in different ways. I try to grow some disease resistant cultivars, like ‘Peron’ and ‘Defiant’. Both are reported to be resistant to several diseases with ‘Defiant’ touted as having late blight resistance. Having resistance does not mean the plants will not get a disease; just that it often won’t kill them (or at least won’t kill them as quickly!). ‘Defiant’ gets some early blight, leaf spots but typically if I continue removing the infected foliage on a weekly basis; it grows out of them and produces well into the fall. The rainy weather has curtailed some of my weekly clean ups so all my tomato plants look a little worse for the wear.

tomato row w hardly any leaves

Tomatoes with few healthy leaves due to disease/wet weather. Photo by dmp.

There are lots of mid-sized and tasty tomatoes on ‘Defiant’ right now but almost all of them have a condition known as yellow shoulder. This is a physiological disorder and while the affected portions of the tomato are showing up yellow on my tomatoes, they may be green, white, or grey on other varieties. These areas are also tougher and not as palatable. The specific cause for this disorder is not known but it is believed to be related to high temperatures, which we certainly were experiencing, lack of potassium, high soil pH and/or perhaps too much magnesium relative to calcium in the soil

tomato yellow shoulders

Defiant tomatoes with yellow shoulder. Photo by dmp.

It’s always fun to try a new tomato variety or two and this year I planted ‘Tasmanian Chocolate’, a unique dwarf with full-sized, 8 to 10 ounce, mahogany red tomatoes on plants about 40 inches tall. The tomatoes are slightly lobed and delicious, but right now all the fruits are terribly cat-faced. This is another physiological condition where the exact cause hasn’t yet been pinpointed. Supposedly, it starts in the early stages of flower bud development. This disorder has been attributed to low temperatures (below 60 F, which I have not experienced), high amounts of nitrogen in the soil and excessive pruning. If anything, any nitrogen in the organic fertilizer I applied around Memorial Day has been washed out with all the rain and mostly I have just been pruning out diseased leaves Herbicide damage was also given as a potential cause but I have woods on two sides of the property and my next-door neighbor has not applied any. I will try this tomato variety again as it is very tasty and does not seem as prone to leaf diseases as some other tomato varieties.

Tomato catface 2

Catfaced Tasmanian Chocolate tomatoes. Photo by dmp.

Then there is ‘Ildi’, a yellow cherry tomato. I like to grow one yellow, one orange and one red cherry tomato mostly because they look so lovely in salads. ‘Sun Gold’ is my go to orange cherry with its exquisite flavor and prolific production. For a red, this year I grew ‘Matt’s Wild Cherry’, which has oodles of half-inch, tasty red tomatoes.

yel jel bean, sungold sw mill, Fair Blue

Cherry tomatoes – Sungold, Sweet Million, Yellow Jelly Bean and Fair Blue. Photo by dmp.

‘Yellow Pear’ had been an old yellow cherry tomato standby and even though it did not crack that easily and outgrew most disease problems, the flavor was rather bland. So, I tried ‘Ildi’ last year and was happy with the flavor and decided to grow this variety again this season. Huge clusters of flowers had formed and I was all ready to enjoy hordes of yellow, sweet tomatoes when I noticed almost all the flowers aborted and only 4 or 5 tomatoes managed to mature per cluster. I believe this is due to the heat we’ve had over the last few weeks and perhaps also lack of pollination due to cloudy, wet weather. Tomatoes are self-fertile but wind and bees do help.

Tomato Ildi aborted blossoms

Only 3 tomatoes in this cluster of ‘Ildi’. Photo by dmp.

Despite the weather and some creature that has been stealing a tomato or two, there are still plenty of tomatoes to be had for fresh eating and for sharing. They say the average American eats about 20 pounds of fresh tomatoes each year. I’m trying to do my part using huge, thick slices of ‘Amish Gold’ for my BLTs.

Tomato Amish Gold BLT

BLT with tomato ‘Amish Gold’. Yumm! Photo by dmp.

Good gardening to all,

Dawn